Does Snapchat add to distracted driving?

Drivers may be tempted to use camera apps to share everyday moments and record their travel speed but using the app could take attention from the road.

Connecticut drivers of all ages face a wide variety of distractions when behind the wheel of a vehicle. According to CNN.com, inattentive driving is linked to more than 3,300 traffic deaths across the country over the course of a single year. Cell phones themselves can add an abundance of distractions to those operating a motor vehicle. Most people are aware of the dangers of texting, but a new craze is sweeping social-media-loving drivers-taking selfies while driving a vehicle. Social media sites like Instagram, Facebook, Twitter and Snapchat may be tempting drivers into taking more and more pictures while driving a car down the road.

Photo-taking could require hands

Removing a hand from the steering wheel is usually not recommended for drivers. However, when taking a picture or opening up the app, those behind the wheel have to use at least one hand. Not to mention the amount of focus it takes to open the app, center the picture, look at the screen and press the camera button. Any camera app could add to the distracted driving problem because it takes hands and focus away from the task at hand.

Speed filter could encourage use while in motion

While drivers can use any camera app to take selfies or pictures of scenery while driving, Snapchat may increase the desire to snap a photo while in a moving vehicle. The app offers a speed filter, which adds the approximate travel speed on top of the image. Drivers or their passengers can snap pictures or short videos to share with their friends showing just how fast they are driving. This speed filter could encourage operators to increase their speed while driving, which could make the use even more dangerous and increase the chances of getting in a motor vehicle crash.

App could increase desire to share in-the-moment activities

Because the pictures and videos stay on the screens for a short period of time, users may want to share exciting and mundane tasks alike. Whether stuck in traffic or cruising down the highway, drivers may want to snap a quick picture to show their friends and family exactly what they are up to. The right-now mentality of the social media app could increase a person's desire to take pictures while doing other activities, such as driving.

Drivers across Connecticut can get distracted by the radio, GPS devices, billboards, passengers and a variety of other aspects, but cellphones and the apps on them tend to be one of the biggest distractors on the road. No matter the factors involved in a crash it may be beneficial for those injured in an accident to work with an attorney who is familiar with this type of personal injury case.