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Texting is not the only distraction for Connecticut teenagers

Most public service announcements on distracted driving focus on texting behind the wheel while ignoring other dangerous behaviors. In a recent survey conducted by Oregon State University, 27 percent of teenagers reported that they change their shoes or clothes as they drive. Some of the other drive-time activities discovered in the study include applying makeup, doing homework and changing contact lenses. As teenagers become busier, they may try to add more dangerous activities into their commute.

On the other hand, the number of teenagers to report they texted while driving decreased when compared to earlier studies, demonstrating that recent anti-texting campaigns may have been effective. However, according to a recent report, a simple action, such as looking down to change a radio station, increases the risk of a car accident because the driver's attention is not on the road.

In addition, Oregon State researchers asked the study's subjects to participate in classes designed to discourage all types of multitasking behind the wheel. These interactive classes ask the students to perform various tasks while being distracted. This helps teenagers realize how much their performance behind the wheel suffers when they are distracted by other activities. A follow-up survey taken after the class showed improvement in the students' understanding of the dangers of multitasking while driving.

Parents of children who have been involved in a motor vehicle accident due to distracted driving might try to contact an attorney to find out about their options for seeking compensation. The attorney could help an injured victim file an action against an allegedly at-fault driver in court.

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